Posts Tagged ‘NSA’

Ron Paul says the “shutdown” debate is “rather annoying”. (Not a real shutdown)

October 4, 2013
Ron Paul Visiblast

Ron Paul Visiblast (Photo credit: Jayel Aheram)

 

Ron Paul says the “shutdown” debate is “rather annoying”.

 

http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2013/10/01/ron-paul-isnt-thrilled-by-rather-annoying-shutdown-debate

 

For example, it’s not a shutdown. The worst parts are still going full blast, including NSA spying and all the “dole” programs. (I don’t call them “entitlements”, a lying word, nobody is “entitled” to steal their neighbor’s anything under any decent law)

 

 

Dark Reading punts at PRISM-Don’t know much about illegal hacking?

June 27, 2013

I just discovered this article at a “Dark Reading” web site. Funny how an author for a dark-side security information web site does not know much about the dark-side surveillance program the entire world just found out about, now weeks ago, even though there have been whistleblowers telling us about it many years ago now, including in a New York Times article in 2009.

But then again, maybe the title is just the author’s way of saying she wants to stay out of prison, and uses a rhyme to kind of get oblique about it. With what they probably know at Dark Reading, maybe they just want to keep their head attached to their bodies?

Getting Out Of PRISM :
http://www.darkreading.com/monitoring/getting-out-of-prism/240156391?cid=SBX_dr_related_commentary_default_compliance&itc=SBX_dr_related_commentary_default_compliance

…Multiply that by thousands of employees, and it’s pretty clear that nobody’s marching in perfect lockstep. (By the way, this is also why grand conspiracy theories are bunk: Nobody’s that good.)

So entities aren’t monolithic, and there is always something going on behind the scenes that you don’t know about — and that might change your opinion on what you do know. For anything that sounds wrong, there is generally a reason behind it that made good sense at the time. This is why I’m not going to opine about the topic of national surveillance: I don’t have enough background information (and I probably never will).

“Nobody’s that good”, they always say. If there was such a massive conspiracy, they couldn’t hide it.

And they roll right over the contradiction without thinking. Hey, guys! They DIDN’T hide it, because now we KNOW about it, and they’re EXPOSED. You think talking about tin-foil hats says anything about anything? You trust a stranger to follow your young girl’s whereabouts and teen parties?

It’s simple. Even for a geek. You’ve got “nothing to hide”, but do you open your bedroom curtains and put a web cam to broadcast your nightly dalliances? Why not? It’s all legal activity, isn’t it? Or is it? And how much of what you do every day is illegal? How do you know, there are 100s of 1000s of pages of laws in this here land now. How can you know you never do anything illegal?

That’s a copout, not that I blame you. I do my own cautionary behaviors. The title says “Getting out of PRISM”, a very clever title, because everybody wants to “get out of PRISM”. We all want a get-out-of-jail (prison) free card too. But pleading ignorance will not save us from guilt.

You don’t have to be an expert to know what is already publicly known.

#1. We know what PRISM is. You know what it is. Your write for a technical web site that purports to be a source for information on exactly this kind of security topic. Besides, by now maybe even your grandmother knows what it is.

[Insert note: With what I saw in a video clip of interviews with
college kids, maybe you don’t know]

You could at least say you’re against it. How hard is that? “I am against universal national surveillance”. See? Or do you know something we don’t? A national surveillance state easily becomes a national police state. This is not “rocket science”, and it’s not even technical. It’s easy.

You could even reference the Electronic Freedom Foundation. They do have plenty of experts that have plenty of background information about this program and its army of cousins, and maybe some that did not get the attention that Snowden did.

And keep in mind there were several whistle-blowers before this one. Back in the day, the Establishment Press could not contain itself enough in praising Elsberg for the Pentagon Papers. My, how things have changed. At this stage, we can tell who is “Establishment Media” by how much they support the official line of the government, or cover up its secrets, or spin an unfortunate spill of secrets. Yep, applies to this UBM web site too I guess.

But the future is not written in stone. There are reasons they did not want this publicized, and there are reasons they want to track each and every one of us. Note the questions the Intelligence Committee in the House did NOT ask the NSA guys in the hearing the other day.

Even the purported maverick Michelle Bachman showed her timidity in her questions and carefully avoiding the hard-hitting followups that should have been asked. Do you listen on calls, she asked. The answer was that they do not “routinely” blah blah. And as to listening in on phone calls, he said, they have to get court orders before they can use the content of phone calls or emails in the courts. Give it a name: The D.C. Two-Step. Dodge to the right, dodge to the left. Shimmy right, shimmy left. Enough to make you dizzy.

The Fourth.

www.trutherator.wordpress.com

What Prism Knows: 8 Metadata Facts – Security – Government and

June 21, 2013

What Prism Knows: 8 Metadata Facts:
http://www.informationweek.com/security/government/what-prism-knows-8-metadata-facts/240156956?pgno=2

This paragraph in particular caught my attention, and I don’t think it even includes the IRS-written additions to the tax code as passed by Congress:

With persistent surveillance, Marlinspike said one fear is that by capturing so much information on U.S. citizens, a determined investigator could likely find some type of charges to file against a suspect, given that legal experts estimate that on the books. “If the federal government had access to every email you’ve ever written and every phone call you’ve ever made, it’s almost certain that they could find something you’ve done which violates a provision in the 27,000 pages of federal statutes or 10,000 administrative regulations,” said Marlinspike. “You probably do have something to hide, you just don’t know it yet.”

And get this juicy bit, notice how this Mr. Lewis makes a real sneaky case, like an illusionist trick I’ll explain:

How much metadata should the government be allowed to capture or use? “The drafters of the Constitution did not propose some absolute right to privacy; they … saw privacy as a means to achieve a larger goal, to protect political liberties,” said James A. Lewis, a senior fellow and director of the Technology and Public Policy Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, in a blog post.

His argument: if it safeguards people’s political liberties, then capturing metadata is a useful technique. “The essential political rights are freedom of expression and assembly, freedom from arbitrary detention, and the right to petition the government for a redress of grievances,” Lewis said. “If these four rights are protected, surveillance is immaterial in its effect on civil liberties.”

He points to four essential “political liberties” as if they are the ones that count, as if they are the only ones that count. Note that he left out another very important one, the one that is DIRECTLY violated by the NSA practices (and no doubt by every

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.
http://www.usconstitution.net/xconst_Am4.html

Massive metadata collection is absolutely UNREASONABLE. We all know that. Blabbing on about these other four “rights” reminds me of the rich young ruler that obeyed four commandments, but he failed on the biggest one, because he loved his riches more than God.

Jailed Qwest CEO had refused NSA requests

June 15, 2013
Qwest logo

Qwest logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

QWEST, NSA, AND INSIDER TRADING?

The Story Of Joseph Nacchio And The NSA – Business Insider:
http://www.businessinsider.com/the-story-of-joseph-nacchio-and-the-nsa-2013-6

Former Qwest CEO Joseph Nacchio is currently serving a six-year sentence after being convicted of insider trading in April 2007 for selling $52 million of stock in the spring of 2001 as the telecommunications carrier appeared to be deteriorating.

During the trial his defense team argued that Nacchio, 63, believed Qwest was about to win secret government contracts that would keep it in the black.

Nacchio alleged that the government stopped offering the company lucrative contracts after Qwest refused to cooperate with a National Security Agency surveillance program in February 2001.

So it’s in the news because of the very public revelations by Edward Snowden in the Guardian. But wait a minute. Is this a “new” story? Guess not. Only “conspiracy theorists” made a big deal of it before, including long before Leslie Cauley’s USA Today story:

Back in 2006 Leslie Cauley of USA Today, citing multiple people with direct knowledge of the arrangement, reported that shortly after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks America’s three largest telecoms signed contracts to provide the NSA with detailed call records from hundreds of millions of people across the country.

Cauley noted that Qwest’s refusal to participate “left the NSA with a hole in its database” since the company served local phone service to 14 million customers in 14 states.

From USA Today (emphasis ours):

The NSA, which needed Qwest’s participation to completely cover the country, pushed back hard. …

the agency suggested that Qwest’s foot-dragging might affect its ability to get future classified work with the government.

Nacchio’s legal concerns about the NSA program at the time mirror those of civil liberty groups today.

Cauley, citing sources familiar with events, reported the NSA asserted that Qwest didn’t need a court order — or approval under Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (which oversees NSA snooping) — to provide the data.

“They told (Qwest) they didn’t want to [run the proposal by the FISA court] because FISA might not agree with them,” one NSA insider told USA Today.

There is a record of the NSA running afoul of FISA: In July the FISA court ruled that the NSA violated the Fourth Amendment’s restriction against unreasonable searches and seizures “on at least one occasion.”

Her sources told Cauley, the author of the USA Today story, that the NSA had said other agencies like FBI, CIA, and the DEA might have access to all that massive database.

Hey, People! What else is true that those crazy tin-foil-hat conspiracy theorists have been telling us?

And looky here, even on CSPAN, we see appearances by NSA spokesmouths doing talks on what this program does and why, and no, there are strict rules on what we look at, we stay inside guidelines.

But do you know why they’re not even denying one thing that Snowden said, that he could have looked at anybody’s records, even the President’s? Because they know that anybody can see that this is obviously and clearly a violation of the Fourth Amendment.

Here’s the Fourth:

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Okay, now read it with the emphasis where it goes. It’s a right to BE secure in you “persons, houses, papers, and effects”. It is NOT a right to FEEL secure, or a right to be secure “if you have nothing to hide”. Remember, this is an amendment that recognizes the natural right of persons to such security. Having thousands of government agents able to spy on anybody at any time is NOT being secure from “searches”.

The amendment does not make an exception for future technology! It is a LIE that it does not. The word “effects” easily extends the spirit of the natural right recognized in this amendment (recognized, not created) to electronic communications between people. The moronic argument that one sends all those private emails into the ether as if they meant it for broadcast to anybody who wants it is stupid.

If any telecommunications company asked for your permission to share all your comings and goings with any third party that wanted it, you/we would say No, of course.

One more point about the Fourth Amendment. The significant word there for the purposes of Orwellian Big Brother Mass Search of data is “persons”. This is a plural of the word “person”, and when a warrant “particular describes” the “persons or things” we would expect those “persons” to be indentified individually.

Like the freedom of speech, of religion, and the freedom of press, and the Fifth, this speaks to the rights of us as individual “persons”, NOT to our rights as groups. It might be “reasonable” to law enforcement to go house to house searching inside for a couple of bombers on the run, but it is not “reasonable” to each and every place they might feel like searching.

For example, take any one house in Watertown, it was not “reasonable” that a particular John Doe had Suspect #2 in hiding in his residence. Nobody was “secure” in their houses or persons that day. Contrary to some government-media spokesmouths’ mutterings, who said it was a “voluntary” lockdown, the evidence is to the contrary.

WOLF BLITZER’S EPISODE OF FOOT-IN-MOUTH DISEASE

Wolf Blitzer stuck his entire foot in his mouth to try to get a whack in at Rand Paul. Never mind the video on youtube that shows Boston’s finest knocking aggressively on doors and literally ordering the occupants outside, so they could go in and search the house.

The Dunkin Donuts operators of those news feeds did not come in, and the policemen wanting their coffee and donuts had to call them and tell them they could come open the store for them.

There is also the story of the policeman that went to fetch milk for a mother’s baby because the mother thought she could not leave the house.

And then Blitzer of course left out of his embarrassing presentation the point Rand Paul raised that it only took FIFTEEN MINUTES after the “lockdown” was raised for a regular citizen to find the bad guy. Could have saved millions of bucks and let people do productive work.

CONGRESS IS CULPABLE FOR THIS BIG-BROTHER-GATE

Let us remember that some of us warned about this when Congress enacted into law a proviso that  exempted all telecommunications companies from any civil or criminal damages resulting from the release of data to government. That was some years ago and it is obscured in the results from search engines.

Here is some relevant data from the Electronic Freedom Foundation:
https://www.eff.org/pages/calea-faq#3

But then with the Patriot Act, the ones ordered to serve up data are ordered to keep it secret. How do we know that the NSA spokesmen are telling us the truth? Are NSA agents, employees and contractors under orders to keep other details secret, like maybe the collection of CONTENT we know they survey as well?

They are now saying this dragnet of all the records of calls and emails only involves the header information. Baloney, because that leads them to where they get all the content they want.

Whistleblowers have already released to the “wild” that they record all the calls in a loop and listen for certain keywords and when those keywords happen, a recording kicks the call content to an analyst. Posted here at Business Insider’s web site is a list of keywords from years back:
http://www.businessinsider.com/nsa-prism-keywords-for-domestic-spying-2013-6

Okay, some people like (Old Guard Establishment Republican) Senator Lindsey Graham, is saying that he has no problem with this universal Big Brother surveillance of everybody because he has “nothing to hide”. Now from the people come calls for Lindsey Graham to give us his passwords so we can check to see whether he has nothing to hide.

WHO HAS SOMETHING TO HIDE?

Well, now we see the biggest coverup of these times of the biggest lawbreakers of our time and for a long time, and that is the NSA itself.

If spying on all of us Americans, and residents and tourists inside the USA, was so harmless, then why did they act like it was something to hide?

Why are they still hiding from any conversation that points out the whistleblower’s exposure to the fact that so many government agents have access to any telephone conversation they wish to listen to? Why are they avoiding the fact, now made public, that they can pull up any email they wish to look at?

Why are they trying to change the subject and shoot the messenger?

Now we know. The NSA gets ALL the header information for whatever they want, and acts like there is no Fourth Amendment when they want to listen to YOUR phone call or look at YOUR email, whoever you are.

Maybe Lindsey Graham says he has nothing to hide precisely because he does have something to hide and somebody at Fort Meade knows about it?

Why are none of these smarter-than-thou clever “reporters” asking questions like that?

There is something rotten not in Denmark but in the USA. Well, probably Denmark too.

Found at Freedomworks: NSA Story Disrupting Left-Right Divide

June 14, 2013
Headquarters of the NSA at Fort Meade, Marylan...

Headquarters of the NSA at Fort Meade, Maryland.  (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

http://www.freedomworks.org/blog/joncgabriel/nsa-story-disrupting-left-right-divide

We’ll learn a lot more in the coming weeks and months about Snowden’s motivations and the PRISM program, but what is clear is that this story has shaken up long-standing ideological categories and party allegiances. When self-identified leftists are accusing President Obama of violating the U.S. Constitution, there is a huge opportunity for the liberty movement.

The old guard in both parties want the NSA story to just go away, so they are trying to turn it into a personality-driven feeding frenzy. This early on, I have no idea if Snowden is a bad guy or a great guy. But the story isn’t about him—it’s about our rights.

If the 29-year-old leaker turns out to be the devil himself, I still wouldn’t want my government spying on Americans’ emails and phone calls. I’m indifferent to Snowden, but I am passionate about civil liberties.

I am glad that conservatives aren’t the only ones upset that Obama’s NSA is snooping on Americans while his IRS punishes political enemies. Party leaders should jump on this rare alliance of left and right to build a stronger coalition of Constitution-loving civil libertarians.

Whistleblowers tell – Wiretapping one Watergate office, now wiretapping everybody!

June 13, 2013
NSA Spy Center

NSA Spy Center (Photo credit: JamesArtre)

 

What if the Republicans or Democrats had called for prosecution against Deep Throat? What if the CIA had brought charges? Nixon had an enemies’ list, what if that were a kill list?

 

What if he had wiretapped not only the Democrats but the Republicans too, and not only political operators but their families, their friends, their acquaintances, and spies, and criminals, and cops, and governors, and Supreme Court justices like Robert Brown, and not only all of those, but every single person living in the United States?

 

What if this had some connection to Justice Roberts’ sudden change of attitude on the Obamacare decision? Before you answer, remember, PRISM was still called a “conspiracy theory” just ten years ago, and even after the New York Times ran a short article on it.

 

EDITORIAL: The Whistleblower – Washington Times:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/jun/11/the-whistleblower/

 

There are a couple of paragraphs that bring out clearly the difference between Watergate and the more recent revelations:

 

(A couple of editors’ notes -mine- are in [brackets])

 

The latest revelations will have no pernicious effect [ed: on
terrorists and enemies] because our enemies assume Uncle Sam has been listening. Al Qaeda operatives use codes, dead drops and encryption to carry out attacks, such as the Boston bombings, under the nose of the mass surveillance. That’s what spies and terrorists do.

 

[The official record of events is that it took ten years to get at
Osama bin Laden, because he did not communicate using the media that
PRISM grabs.]

 

Google, Facebook and the other companies play along, denying that the government is directly tapping into their servers. This is an empty assurance, considering that these companies could never legally admit to allowing a tap. The court order authorizing blanket interception of “all call-detail records” from Verizon instructs that “no person shall disclose to any other person that the FBI or NSA has sought or obtained tangible things under this order.”

 

The next paragraph is a point that has not yet been made:

 

Such extreme secrecy isn’t about making sure that China or the Taliban never learn about U.S. surveillance capabilities, but about keeping ordinary Americans in the dark about what’s going on. The Nixon administration was brought low by the bungled bugging of the Democratic National Committee headquarters 41 years ago. Now every telephone in the country is tapped. A lot of people are unhappy about it, and we can be sure that the unelected bureaucrats in charge of these powerful surveillance tools will say whatever it takes to keep them.

A few analysts operating in secret have access to every embarrassing photograph, incriminating text message and off-color remark ever made on a telephone or over the Internet. The lesson here, so far, is that if the government won’t tell the public what’s going on, someone will. It’s not the way to run a government, but this government brought it upon itself. The Founding Fathers would never have entrusted power over such information to a handful of men. Neither should we.

Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/jun/11/the-whistleblower/#ixzz2W6XP2ldQ
Follow us: @washtimes on Twitter

 

The cat is out of the bag, now we all know, the American government has now admitted it, the truth is on the loose and in the wild, wild, untamed wilderness of the Internet. No wonder the president doesn’t like the New Media, Bush didn’t either of course.

 

CONSPIRACY THEORIES — WHAT ELSE ARE THEY HIDING

 

In 2012 Old Media was still denying what some of us were protesting against what we knew 20 years ago. As long ago as a six months, the ignored warnings were called “conspiracy theories”.

 

Nixon was impeached and pushed out of office for covering up the operation to wiretap the phones of the political opposition to listen in to their conversations.

 

Now, we have a case of two administrations connected with two different political parties, engaging in wiretapping everybody in the nation, not just around the world, and intercepting the communications of ALL of us.

 

EUROPE (AND RUSSIA AND CHINA) ARE NOT BLAMELESS

 

Europe is of course acting all indignant, like they would never do such a thing, but the same watchmen who warned about what the NSA is doing have also fingered the Europeans.

 

Europeans, Echelon is yours too. Western nations trade intelligence, but they also spy on each other. We know this. But this puts some meat to those bones.

 

NO WONDER THEY HATE THE INTERNET AND NEW MEDIA

 

No wonder exposed political operatives and politicians don’t like the New Media. The cyber-security flap is all about getting control, however they can. Copyright, patents, security, they’ll use anything to be able to have the Chinese-style “flip switch” that Joe Lieberman pined for, to be able to shut down the Internet with a button controlled from the White House.

 

The Chinese had a Cultural Revolution too, were upwards of 20 million were killed for thinking different, with a bunch of personal grudges thrown in, no doubt. What makes the Lieberman think he can get an Internet switch without a cultural revolution government?

 

+==================================+

 

Proverbs 15:3
The eyes of the Lord are in every place, beholding the evil and the good.

 

Luke 8:17
For nothing is secret, that shall not be made manifest; neither any thing hid, that shall not be known and come abroad.

 

Galatians 6:7
Be not deceived; God is not mocked: for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap.

 

Isaiah 1:18
Come now, and let us reason together, saith the Lord: though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool.

 

Revelation 3:20
Behold, I stand at the door, and knock: if any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him, and he with me.

 

 

Look at this, then ask again, Why Should We Trust Our Government With Our LIves and Livelihood?

January 15, 2013
Cray X-MP/24 (serial no. 115) used by NSA

Cray X-MP/24 (serial no. 115) used by NSA (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

4 Officers Arrested For Illegal Strip And Body Cavity Searches Will Stand Trial:
http://libertycrier.com/front-page/4-officers-arrested-for-illegal-strip-and-body-cavity-searches-will-stand-trial/

MILWAUKEE — Four Milwaukee police officers accused of conducting illegal strip and body cavity searches must now stand trial.

Obama said adding $4 trillion to the debt is unpatriotic (in 2008):

NSA whistleblower says their illegal data collection is a “violation of everybody’s Constitutional rights“:
http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2012/09/15/nsa-whistleblower-illegal-data-collection-a-violation-of-everybodys-constitutional-rights/

Bill Binney believes he helped create a monster.

Sitting in the innocuous surroundings of an Olive Garden in the Baltimore suburbs, the former senior National Security Agency (NSA) official even believes he owes the whole American people an apology.

Binney, a tall, professorial man in his late 60s, led the development of a secret software code he now believes is illegally collecting huge amounts of information on his fellow citizens. For the staunch Republican, who worked for 32 years at the NSA, it is a civil liberties nightmare come true.
So Binney has started speaking out as an NSA whistleblower – an act that has earned him an armed FBI raid on his home. “What’s happening is a violation of the constitutional rights of everybody in the country. That’s pretty straightforward. I could not be associated with it,” he told the Guardian.
read more

Disarmament crusader Diane Feinstein in 1995 loudly proclaimed having carried a concealed weapon:
http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2012/09/15/nsa-whistleblower-illegal-data-collection-a-violation-of-everybodys-constitutional-rights/

Licensing is a waste:
http://libertycrier.com/business/why-its-illegal-to-braid-hair-without-a-license/

Lawmaker wants probe of EPA experiments on humans | Fox News:
http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2012/10/05/lawmaker-wants-hearings-following-lawsuit-on-illegal-experiments-by-epa/

be you want to drink raw milk but now you can’t get it from your neighbor across the state line, even if you’re in a state that’s sympathetic to natural foods. Golly, even in organic-crazy California you can get arrested for selling raw milk.
http://libertycrier.com/government/nations-largest-raw-milk-dairy-sues-fda-over-interstate-ban/

And what don’t we know? They pass tens of thousands of bills without reading them, and we don’t know what all there are… How do you know they won’t come after your favorite vice?

How much is too much?