Archive for the ‘Intelligent Design’ Category

IRS and Feds engaging in more prosecutorial criminality

March 8, 2015

Here’s another case of federal and IRS prosecutorial criminality.

He’s a creationist who is well-known among Christians who are interested in the topic. He was, in the opinion of m many, the most effective creationist speaker. His invitations to speak were many, he had years scheduled in advance. They sold the videos in DVDs but made clear that permission was granted to copy them, as long as they were given away, and they were download-able on the Internet.

The IRS put him away for 10 years claiming “structuring”. Structuring is when somebody follows the law but somebody at the IRS decides you’re trying to avoid the reporting requirements. They got the structuring laws passed by claiming it was a “tool” to go after drug traffickers.

There were other bogus charges and then the first thing the judge did after a request from prosecution was to ban the defense strategy. There were all kinds of things they also threw at him.

He had been denounced by a jealous Christian school director in the same town of Pensacola.

I just discovered that as the end of his sentence draws near, they have created more bogus charges to keep him in prison. The judge presiding –note this!– has banned all taking of notes, and has banned everyone from having a Bible open in the courtroom. I am not making this up.

Outside the courtroom after one session:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bgaZFQrKBn4

Kent Hovind’s blog: http://www.kenthovindblog.com

https://www.facebook.com/drkenthovind

http://ytmp.blogspot.com

Forbes is reporting on it:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/peterjreilly/2014/10/29/government-coming-down-harder-on-kent-hovind/

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Secular creation myths

November 1, 2012
English: Amino Acids

English: Amino Acids (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Some people can’t bring themselves to believe that somebody turned water into wine or that water covered the earth for a few weeks once upon a time, but look at this list of myths they do believe in:

(1) that something came from nothing, the whole universe in fact,

(2) and that it made sure to create itself complete with more than a dozen specific physical constants, fine-tuned to tens of thousands of decimal places to make sure humanity would be able to thrive,

(3) that eager to make more complicated stuff from nothing, this stuff organized itself into nucleotides, which in turn eagerly pushed the left-handed amino acids into a strings composed of about 10 to the 9th nucleotides,

(4) to become the building blocks of DNA and all life,

(5) and of course creating a computer with a design programmed into a digital computer, complete with a machine language, and interpreter systems that carry out the instructions on how to fold more chains of the same stuff into proteins that organize the environment of this system,

(6) and that this turned into a vast array of all kinds of biological units that a-knows where to get its energy, b-has complicated system designs that process that energy, c-reproduces itself, d-many of which seek out other systems similar to itself to exchange design information, and e-repairs itself.

(7) Who also believes that global warming is an immediate danger to the planet because Al Gore‘s beachfront property will be flooded,

(8) That Drake’s equation is some kind of scientific formula,

(9) That even though the sun makes a difference of up to 50 degrees a day in temperature, that they can turn on the furnace and heat up the atmosphere more than the sun can,

(10) and that knowing the difference between men and women is like thinking that the races are different, in spite of the fact that the “races” are a bit of melanin only, and a couple of trivial items, whereas the sexes are an entire chromosome different…

 

 

Rick Warren’s Bible Illiteracy Campaign, and KC Brownstone’s Scientific Illiteracy Campaign

September 23, 2012

 

Statue of Isaac Newton at the Oxford Universit...

Statue of Isaac Newton at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History. Note apple. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

K..C Brownstone writes in her blog about the Christian Post report that Rick Warren says he wants to solve a Biblical illiteracy problem: http://kcbrownstone.wordpress.com/2012/01/05/rick-warrens-illiteracy-problem/

In view of Rick Warren’s flip-flop about homosexual marriage, and his approach to using government money confiscated (“stolen”) from other people to fund his projects, one must ask about his own Biblical illiteracy. His problem with Biblical literacy is most visible in the fact that he quotes liberally from 15 different translations of the Bible in some of his books and pretends they are equally valid.

Most of us would question whether a hippopotamus and an elephant and a behemoth are the same animal, and whether a hippos

That’s one issue. Then Brownstone does an association-link with another issue and says Rick Warren “has a lot to do” with a “scientific illiteracy” problem. Seeing that she brings Darwinism-deniers into the mix and mentions Ken Ham, presumably she sees rejection of Darwinism as scientific illiteracy.

Well, well. That’s news to Isaac Newton and his friends in the heavenlies right now, and it’s causing a laugh riot for a battalion of angels who are also sad to see people who believe in theories created by men who denied Creation and went trying to find a different explanation.

Scientists that believed in the Biblical history of the week of Creation, in fact, have numbered in the tens of thousands in recent centuries, including some of the most outstanding in today’s science textbooks that scrupulously avoid mentioning their declarations of Creation faith. Many are listed at the Institute for Creation Research web site: http://www.icr.org/article/185/

Blaise Pascal, Kepler, Kelvin, Michael Faraday, Pasteur, Linnaeus, the list goes on and on.

So was Isaac Newton afflicted with “scientific illiteracy” for believing in the six days Creation?

Oh wait! You say it’s because he hadn’t come across the brilliant “discovery” of natural selection by Charles Darwin?

New? Hah. Greeks in the 5th and 6th century wrote various similar theories. There have been various version of “Darwinian” theories since Darwin, too.

Maybe, just maybe, Darwin knew about them. One wrote about animals over time having descendants that were different, and all animals were related. Yes, we were not taught this in our public schools.

We were never taught about the strong faith of the founders of the main branches of science of today. “Historically ignorant” science books taught us that Columbus “proved” that the world was round, whereas in the real world every knowledgeable person around the world knew this from the times of the ancient Greeks, and it’s even in a verse in Isaiah.

Not that the tautologies used to stamp Darwinism into young minds are any good explanation.

Here you can find a list of modern scientists who believe the Bible, meaning they believe what it says, including Creation: http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2761001/posts

They are many, and the list is growing leaps and bounds as young scientists with open minds discover the facts that were not taught them in college courses, or they apply the logic rules they learned to the issue.

Nobody can accuse Michael Crichton of “scientific illiteracy” but he is so accused of same in the mix because in said article anybody who doubts the unquestionable dogma of global warming is so accused.

He exposed it for what it was, and that was before Climategate exposed the fact that they have to commit fraud to make the thing stick. There is one guy who tore into the infamous Climategate study, tore the methodology to shreds, who now advertises himself as a “convert”, never mind he was recorded as saying he believed in it, just that it needed better methodology. Never mind his own study has been exposed as having its own ugly and untenable and indefensible practices.

Back to “scientific illiteracy’. NASA’s scientists with all their billions of years of wisdom, made predictions for the magnetic field strength of the planets Uranus and Neptune. What a surprise, they were orders of magnitude wrong, wrong, wrong.

Creation scientist in physics and large-scale magnetic phenomena, and inventor with dozens of patents with his name on them, Russ Humphreys, made a different prediction. He was spot on.

His predictions about the rapidity of the decline in the magnetic field of Mercury, also very very close to what it turns out to be, show there is some prediction power in believing that Genesis One is a historical narrative that tells us how God did it.

 

Demoted for views, NASA specialist going to court

March 5, 2012

Well, at least they’re not sending us to insane asylums… Yet…

http://www.wnd.com/2012/03/demoted-for-views-nasa-specialist-going-to-court/

A trial is starting in just days on a claim by a space scientist that he was demoted for expressing his views on intelligent design, the theory that the universe and life are too complex to have randomly erupted from a puddle of sludge on some prehistoric landscape.

The case is a response to a punishment handed down to David Coppedge, a worker at the NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab, which sent the unmanned spacecraft Galileo to Jupiter and dispatched a ship named Dawn to orbit asteroids Vesta and Ceres.

Looks suspicious already, said the judge:

“A trier of fact would be entitled to disbelieve defendant’s stated reasons for the adverse employment actions,” the court opinion continued. “A trier could find it suspicious that defendant initially investigated plaintiff for workplace harassment, issued a written warning that was later rescinded, and demoted plaintiff for reasons separate from the alleged workplace harassment. The shifting nature of defendant’s response to the alleged workplace harassment could cause a trier of fact to question the legitimacy of the demotion and written warning.”

And it seems that the Jet Propulsion Laboratories, run by the California Institute of Technology, actually brought religion into the reason they were punishing him:

Coppedge was a high-level “team lead” technical specialist before his demotion and later removal. The California Institute of Technology runs JPL under a contract with NASA.

Employees shouldn’t be threatened with termination and punished for sharing their opinion with willing co-workers just because the view being shared doesn’t fit the prevailing view in the workplace,” said Becker.

“Mr. Coppedge has always maintained that intelligent design is a scientific theory, but JPL has illegally discriminated against him on the basis of what they deem is ‘religion,’” Becker said.

 

 

 

 

A trial is starting in just days on a claim by a space scientist that he was demoted for expressing his views on intelligent design, the theory that the universe and life are too complex to have randomly erupted from a puddle of sludge on some prehistoric landscape.

The case is a response to a punishment handed down to David Coppedge, a worker at the NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab, which sent the unmanned spacecraft Galileo to Jupiter and dispatched a ship named Dawn to orbit asteroids Vesta and Ceres.

The case will be tried starting Wednesday in Los Angeles, where the Superior Court of California earlier refused to rule in favor of the lab without a trial. The court determined there is sufficient evidence for a jury to consider.

The court then found “there are triable issues of fact as to whether plaintiff’s demotion, written warning, negative performance evaluations, and ultimate termination were adverse employment actions. … While the written warning or negative performance evaluations may not be actionable in isolation, a trier of fact would be entitled to consider them as a part of a generalized discriminatory response to plaintiff’s religious views or protected activities.”

“A trier of fact would be entitled to disbelieve defendant’s stated reasons for the adverse employment actions,” the court opinion continued. “A trier could find it suspicious that defendant initially investigated plaintiff for workplace harassment, issued a written warning that was later rescinded, and demoted plaintiff for reasons separate from the alleged workplace harassment. The shifting nature of defendant’s response to the alleged workplace harassment could cause a trier of fact to question the legitimacy of the demotion and written warning.”