Controlled drug wars and rock music of the 1960s and 1970s

http://www.thedailybell.com/news-analysis/35463/Why-Popular-Music-Is-Less-Successful-These-Days/

(Pre-datum) My son is a music producer. He says every minute of every day on the music stations is paid for by the guys who run the industry. He said it’s supposed to be illegal (payola) but they “find ways”. They play a song constantly till the audience gets used to it.

When I found out about it, I thought it was very curious (read “suspicious”) that Timothy Leary was a CIA agent. Especially since other whistleblowers of the day said the hard(er) rock of the 1960s was pushed to soften the kids for drug  sales. How about that, that’s when Nixon ramped up the drug wars.

Friend of mine in college was torn up because he was a (Trotskyite!) Communist but the Beatles he loved (?) sang “count me out” of any violence, dissing Mao by name! Then he excitedly told me one day he had discovered the chorus was singing “Count me in”. Maybe. It “inspired” me to listen carefully to my favorite group for the slogans I wanted to hear, but nope, not there. The only subtle message was one song I realized drove the more suggestible into unlimited and uncaring drug use by the effect of its lyrics. It occurred to me later on that this same band sang Sympathy For the Devil.

It made me furious. Listened to other groups. Yep. Eugenics with ego stroking in one song, “Your mind, your mind is a thoroughbred”. Another sang literally “You are a puppet on a string, you will remember everything”. Unbelievable I thought. My friends thought it was nothing. Nobody thought much of it until a psychologist who was a music school director told me there is a word for music, it induces a “mild hypnotic state”.

Argggh. And I loved the hard rock style, alas. BUT there were a couple of glimmers of light in the mix. Don McLean’s Bye Bye Miss American Pie (lamenting the destructive nature of some of the new stuff). It’s gonna be a bright, sunshine-y day. Oh Happy Day. When I joined a missionary movement it was refreshing to enjoy music I could trust written by peers I knew. Mostly really joyous, some sad ones. We used to say it ought to make people “glad, sad, or mad”.

Glad to see some libertarian crooners out there.

 

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