Morality, virtue, and a universal definition

English: Saint Patrick stained glass window fr...

English: Saint Patrick stained glass window from Cathedral of Christ the Light, Oakland, CA. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Religious people” do NOT fit into any such descriptive stereotype as some put forth, not in the real world. Many have a kind of Hollywood caricature of them. Most people don’t understand Christianity. A libertarian society could only come forth from a Christian legacy, expanded on the concept of the sovereign individual. The sovereign individual was always implicit in the laws of Moses and then then the historical, poetic and prophetic books of the Old Testament (the Tanukh). God was their ruler and He was the chief law enforcer of the laws of Moses, with priests only functioning for some immediate arbitration of disputes and to serve betimes as judges in cases of criminal acts.

Those who cry foul at the limited number of “capital” crimes are the same who today scream bloody murder if anybody questions their sacred doctrines or utters some forbidden thought, like maybe homosexuality is not morally equivalent to dark skin. Like David said, “I am for peace: but when I speak, they are for war”. (Psalm 120:7)

There is another lie pushed by Parrot Media and Compliant Press, relating to science. St. Patrick‘s legacy is literacy, learning, and the shaming away of slavery in Europe, Isaac Newton and his peers with science based on experimentation, observation, repeatability, Martin Luther and other such peers’ legacy is the INDIVIDUAL’s own responsibility for his own salvation and his life). Christ said he came to “set the captives free”.

The Golden Rule is universal in one form or another, to all religions and even most atheists claim a form of it when challenged for the basis of their own claim to “morality” or to “virtue”.

“Do unto others as you would have them do unto you” is pretty strong, but what can be expected of all is to at least expect reciprocity. Everyone knows, when intellectually honest, that it’s wrong to kill, because they don’t want to be killed. Everyone knows it’s wrong to steal, because they get miffed-plus if somebody robs them. And so on. And forcing a conversion is anathema to a true believer, as it is a false conversion.

The difference for truly believing Christians as opposed to the hum-drum  is that the greatest commandment (love God with heart, mind and soul) requires a recognition that they will have to answer to the Christian God for all their works and deeds.

UNFORTUNATELY in this generation the disclaimer is necessary to point out that a “Christian” by mouth and external label is no counter-example to the previous paragraph if his actions are those of one who does NOT believe he will have to answer for his deeds to a loving and merciful God.

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One Response to “Morality, virtue, and a universal definition”

  1. Reply to a Skeptic « Trutherator's Weblog Says:

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